Writer of Short Stories & Novels
“Will You Meet Me There, Out Beyond the Bend?”
Nightmare
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“The Last Novelist (or A Dead Lizard in the Yard)”
Bifrost
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“In Memory of a Summer’s Day”
Mad Hatters and March Hares
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“The Last Novelist (or A Dead Lizard in the Yard)”
Tor.com
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“Love Engine Optimization”
Lightspeed Magazine 85
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“One Spring in Cherryville”
Available in most ebook formats
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“The Garden Beyond Her Infinite Skies”
XB-1
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“The Singularity is in Your Hair”
Cyber World
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“The Sounds of Old Earth”
科幻世界 (Science Fiction World)
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“The Problem of Meat”
Grendelsong
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“The Meeker and the All-Seeing Eye”
Nebula Awards Showcase 2016
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“Demon in Aisle 6”
Nightmare Magazine 38
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“The Meeker and the All-Seeing Eye”
World Chinese SF Association
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“The Thing in the Refrigerator That Could Stop Time”
Apex Science Fiction and Horror Digest
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“Marie and the Mathematicians”
Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine #26
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“The Writing’s on the Wall”
Farrago's Wainscot #5
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“The Sembla”
A Field Guide to Surreal Botany
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“The Girl in the Basement”
Hatter Bones
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“Saving Diego”
Interzone #221
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“The Spaces Between Things”
Electric Velocipede 17/18
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“The Girl in the Basement”
Apex Magazine, Vol 3, Issue 3
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“The Suffering Gallery”
Beneath Ceaseless Skies - Issue 57
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“The History Within Us”
Clarkesworld Magazine #42
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“The History Within Us”
The People of the Book
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“The Hands That Feed”
Steam-Powered: Lesbian Steampunk Stories
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“The Bricks of Gelecek”
Naked City
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“The Hands That Feed”
The Mammoth Book of Steampunk
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“The Suffering Gallery”
The Best of Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Year Three
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“The Great Game at the End of the World”
After
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“The Sounds of Old Earth”
Lightspeed Magazine and io9.com
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“The History Within Us”
Clarkesworld Year Four
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“The Last Probe”
Launch Pad
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“Pheth’s Aviary”
Beneath Ceaseless Skies - Issue 133
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“The Meeker and the All-Seeing Eye”
Clarkesworld Magazine #92
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“The Sounds of Old Earth”
XB-1 Issue 8/2014
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“The Sounds of Old Earth”
Космопорт (Kosmoport)
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“The History Within Us”
XB-1 Issue 11/2014
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“Cameron Rhyder’s Legs”
Clarkesworld Magazine #98
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“The Sounds of Old Earth”
Nebula Awards Showcase 2015
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“The Garden Beyond Her Infinite Skies”
Clarkesworld Magazine
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Reading at Line Break

I’ll be reading at the Line Break reading series in Astoria, Queens on November 4th. The series is hosted by Bill Shunn. Joining me are: Peter Bryce, Austin Grossman, Sam J. Miller, David Mills, and Kem Joy Ukwu. Hope you can join us! 


“Where Writers Write” Guest Post for the Next Best Book Blog
My writing desk in Maine

My writing desk in Maine

My guest post for “Where Writers Write” is up today at The Next Best Book Blog.

As most writers know, finding the perfect place to write is almost as challenging as writing itself. Of course, some will say that there is no perfect place to write. That you must write everywhere and anywhere you can. Perhaps that’s true. But for anyone who has ever tried to write in a crowded coffee shop, with babies screaming, people on cell phones, and the guy in the table beside you who keeps sniffling and smells like he put on too much cologne this morning — well, I’d say that some spots are better than others.

You can read the full post here.


Interview in The Queens Courier

The The Queens Courier has just posted an interview I did with them last week about writing, my forthcoming novel King of Shards, and living in Ridgewood, Queens. From the article:

Ridgewood-based author Matthew Kressel has already been nominated for several awards for his short stories, and this October he will delve into a new realm when he releases his debut novel titled “King of Shards.”

Kressel has written more than 20 short stories in his career, including “The Sounds of Old Earth” and “The Meeker and the All-Seeing Eye,” which were both Nebula Award nominees for Best Short Story in 2013 and 2014 respectively.

“I’ve written a bunch of short stories, but this is my first novel,” Kressel said. “It’s very different. Novels give you obviously more space to explore ideas, you can take time with certain aspects of the story and plot that you can’t do in a short story. In a short story, every word has to count. And it’s not that it doesn’t count in a novel, it’s just that you have more breathing space, more room to play.”

You can read the full interview and article here.