Science Fiction & Fantasy Writer
“The History Within Us”
Future Science Fiction Digest - Issue 0
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“Love Engine Optimization”
The Year's Best Science Fiction and Fantasy, 2018 Edition
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“The Last Novelist (or a Dead Lizard in the Yard)”
The Best Science Fiction of the Year: Volume 3
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“The Marsh of Camarina”
Shades Within Us
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“Will You Meet Me There, Out Beyond the Bend?”
Nightmare Magazine 63
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“The Sounds of Old Earth”
Smokopolitan nr 10
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“The Last Novelist (or a Dead Lizard in the Yard)”
Bifrost
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“In Memory of a Summer’s Day”
Mad Hatters and March Hares
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“The Last Novelist (or a Dead Lizard in the Yard)”
Tor.com
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“Love Engine Optimization”
Lightspeed Magazine 85
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“The Garden Beyond Her Infinite Skies”
XB-1
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“The Singularity is in Your Hair”
Cyber World
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“The Sounds of Old Earth”
科幻世界 (Science Fiction World)
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“The Problem of Meat”
Grendelsong
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“The Meeker and the All-Seeing Eye”
Nebula Awards Showcase 2016
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“Demon in Aisle 6”
Nightmare Magazine 38
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“The Meeker and the All-Seeing Eye”
World Chinese SF Association
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“The Thing in the Refrigerator That Could Stop Time”
Apex Science Fiction and Horror Digest
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“Marie and the Mathematicians”
Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine #26
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“The Writing’s on the Wall”
Farrago's Wainscot #5
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“The Sembla”
A Field Guide to Surreal Botany
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“The Girl in the Basement”
Hatter Bones
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“Saving Diego”
Interzone #221
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“The Spaces Between Things”
Electric Velocipede 17/18
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“The Girl in the Basement”
Apex Magazine, Vol 3, Issue 3
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“The Suffering Gallery”
Beneath Ceaseless Skies - Issue 57
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“The History Within Us”
Clarkesworld Magazine #42
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“The History Within Us”
The People of the Book
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“The Hands That Feed”
Steam-Powered: Lesbian Steampunk Stories
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“The Bricks of Gelecek”
Naked City
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“The Hands That Feed”
The Mammoth Book of Steampunk
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“The Suffering Gallery”
The Best of Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Year Three
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“The Great Game at the End of the World”
After
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“The Sounds of Old Earth”
Lightspeed Magazine and io9.com
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“The History Within Us”
Clarkesworld Year Four
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“The Last Probe”
Launch Pad
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“Pheth’s Aviary”
Beneath Ceaseless Skies - Issue 133
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“The Meeker and the All-Seeing Eye”
Clarkesworld Magazine #92
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“The Sounds of Old Earth”
XB-1 Issue 8/2014
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“The Sounds of Old Earth”
Космопорт (Kosmoport)
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“The History Within Us”
XB-1 Issue 11/2014
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“Cameron Rhyder’s Legs”
Clarkesworld Magazine #98
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“The Sounds of Old Earth”
Nebula Awards Showcase 2015
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“The Garden Beyond Her Infinite Skies”
Clarkesworld Magazine
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Story Sale to Lightspeed

I’m happy to announce that my short story “Truth is Like the Sun” will appear in a future issue of Lightspeed Magazine. The story is told in a modern epistolary (letter) format and concerns a trans Persian-Thai rock star who performs a musical set from orbit and literally breaks the internet. No news yet on when the story will be released.  


Essay in The Writer’s Book of Doubt

The Dreaded Empty Signing Queue

Some of you may remember my essay from a couple of years back called “Overcoming Self-Doubt as a Writer,” which was published on the SFWA blog. That essay will be included a new book called The Writer’s Book of Doubt, edited by Aidan Doyle. I think it’s a great idea. Artists of all shapes and sizes struggle with self-doubt and depression, and a handbook on how to overcome the worst of those humps would be super-useful. But the book will only see the light of day if it makes its Kickstarter funding goal. Can you help out?

Donate to the Kickstarter here.


See You on the Radio
Wait, you mean we were supposed to bathe first?

Maniac, a new series on Netflix starring Emma Stone & Jonah Hill.

The last time I was on Jim Freund’s Hour of the Wolf radio program, I had no idea he was going to put it up on Facebook Live, and so, well, I didn’t shave or put on a nice shirt. Viewers saw me, like a wild animal, in my natural state. This time, when I was on Jim’s program this past Wednesday, I made sure to clean myself up.

Jim and I talked about TV shows, the state of the genre, and about 1h21m into the show, I read “The Marsh of Camarina,” my story about AI and job replacement that appeared in the anthology Shades Within Us. You can see the most recent Facebook Live recording here.

My Geeks Guide to the Galaxy discussion, just released, was thankfully audio only. So listeners will have no idea if I am waxing philosophical about the Netflix show Maniac in my underwear. It’s up to you to decide. 

Seriously, though, I had a lot of fun discussing that show with Chandler Klang Smith, Rajan Khanna & host David Barr Kirtley. You can check out the show here.

More to come soon, after I finish the damn novel.

 


How Viewing Our Own Social Graph Might Help Reduce Cultural Polarization
This was originally posted on Twitter, but I’ve unrolled it here because I’d like to open this to further discussion, and I feel Twitter is too ephemeral to maintain that type of interrogation.
 
So I’ve been thinking about how polarized our culture has become lately, and what we might do to remedy it.
 
Then I read a few articles on MIT @techreview. First this one about the influence of social media — first positive and hyped, and then negative and denigrated:

And this one about how we all place ourselves into “filter bubbles.” Many people in one scientific study “were surprised to learn just how cocooned inside far-right or far-left bubbles they were.” 

So it got me thinking about how *everyone* might better visualize their own cocoons, and what tools might let the average person know (right or left, elf or wizard) their own cognitive biases. 
 
The perfect data for this is our *own* social graph. The social media companies: YouTube, Facebook, Twitter — they all obscure our social graphs from us. 
 
This is good business practice for them. Why is keeping our data hidden from us a good thing for them? Because they profit from our social graph. They use it to advertise to us. It is their primary business model. 
 
But we should at least be able to view our *own* social graph easily. I mean, if they’re going to profit off of graphs of our clicks and likes and web-page visits, then at least we should be able to see those graphs too. 
 
So I started looking for tools that might easily show us our *own* social graphs. The social media companies at least make a show of saying we can always download our own data. But how easy is this? I mean for the average person to view? 
 
Some googling led me to this page, where I was surprised that the tool did just what I was looking for. It shows you your social graph in easy to understand visual diagrams.  wolframalpha.com/facebook/
 
Excited, I followed the link to the Facebook app. But lo and behold, I get a 404: File Not Found.  apps.facebook.com/wolframconnect…
 
Either @Wolfram_Alpha or @facebook removed the link to that app. Which is a damn shame, because, as the articles above suggest, seeing visualizations of our own social graph might help us overcome the extreme polarization of our culture right now. 
 
I think visualizing how we, ourselves, are connecting with the (digital) world might raise awareness of our own cognitive biases. This is true for people of all parts of the political spectrum. 
 
I don’t see how more awareness is a bad thing. When someone is disturbed, a therapist usually works to bring the troubling issues to consciousness. Through awareness and reframing, the trauma is healed. 
 
I think a tool like the Wolfram one above, and others just like it if they exist (I will search for more), might help us to heal as a culture. I believe it would be one tool that’s worth trying. 
 
PS: here’s a page showing what some of those charts might look like: blog.stephenwolfram.com/2012/08/wolfra…

Cli-Fi & Solarpunk Panel, Plus Writing Conferences!

Last week I participated in SFWA’s #ThePanel YouTube live videocast, Episode 4 – “Cli-fi” and Solarpunk, with panelists Sam J. Miller, Dr. Laurel J. Standley, J.K. Ullrich, and moderated by Diane Morrison. As readers of this blog and followers of my social media feeds know, I feel strongly about environmental causes and averting the worst predictions of climate change. I do this by bringing attention to our common fatalism. What I mean is that we are so often used to pessimistic thinking about the future — that climate change is inevitable — that we don’t work to bring about potential solutions. In my (recent) fiction and on social media, I work to counter this pessimistic force. I am not a head-in-the-sand Polyanna. I don’t believe that a positive future is the only outcome. But I believe that with hard, concerted effort, we can mitigate the worst predictions of climate change and perhaps even bring about an abundant future for humanity.

In this panel, I and my co-panelists speak about the reasons we each write and are concerned about climate change, and some ways our fiction may address the issue. It was a really interesting panel, and I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

Also, this weekend I’ll be attending the Milford Readers and Writers Festival in Milford, PA, where I’ll be doing a reading, a signing, and a panel alongside Chandler Klang Smith, Karen Heuler, and Mercurio D. Rivera. Plus I have new fancy schmancy full-color cosmic business cards to show off. If you are in the area, I hope you can come by! 


Writing, Travel & Conferences

Hello! So, after a brief hiatus where my wife and I traveled around the Southwestern U.S. visiting the National Parks, I’ve been back at the keyboard since the beginning of September. Since then I’ve revised and sent out a short story, and have been revising the YA novel.


I’ll be attending a few conferences & writing festivals in the next several months, so if you happen to be at one of these, please come say hi. I don’t bite (often).


My conference schedule:



Hope to see you soon!