Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Author
Interview in Outer Places

I recently had the pleasure of speaking with Chris Mahon of Outer Places and the interview gone up live on their website. I talk about the Singularity, data privacy, technological ethics, and my long and short fiction.

You can check out the interview here.


The Best And Worst Aspects of Cyberpunk

cover_cyber-worldOver at Tor.com I participate in a discussion about “The best and worst aspects of Cyberpunk,” with authors Madeline Ashby, Stephen Graham Jones, Cat Rambo, Nisi Shawl and Alyssa Wong. Which of course is just an excuse for me to pepper my answer with covert Blade Runner references. Here’s the lede:

Cyberpunk. It’s about cybernetics, neuroscience, nanotech, and transhumanism—and much more than that. The upcoming anthology from Hex Publishers, Cyber World, looks at how the technological changes we all face have inspired new stories to address our fears, hopes, dreams, and desires. All this as Homo sapiens evolves—or not—into its next incarnation.

Some of the most talented science fiction writers of today contributed to Cyber World, which presents diverse tales of humanity’s tomorrow. Today six of those authors answer the question “What are the best and worst aspects of cyberpunk, as either a reader or a writer?” Read their answers and tell us your own thoughts in the comments!

You can read the full article here.

 

 


Positive Future vs. the Singularity
Simple solutions, not cosmic ones.

Simple, real solutions, not cosmic ones.

Believing technology may be the solution to many of humankind’s problems is not the same thing as wanting the trans-human Singularity, that modern cultist, nerdist philosophy that believes in 30 years or less technology will progress so quickly that the future will be as unrecognizable to us as an iPhone is to a goldfish. Believing in the revolutionary power of technology is not an either or proposition, i.e. you believe in the Singularity or you’re a Luddite. I’ve seen it suggested that conspicuous consumption and early adoption really only serve to “fill a crushing vacuousness” in our lives. Maybe in that small case. But the vacuousness is only there if you don’t have a clearly defined long-term goal, if your path from dawn to dusk involves going through the motions, without considering the future beyond the next iteration of Star Wars or version 10 point whatever of your favorite video game.

In other words, an empty life is a choice you make, sometimes without knowing you are making a choice.

Technology can be used for good things, if we make that conscious choice. Solar power, electric cars, satellite internet access to under-served areas of the globe so that people can have greater access to educational materials, which in turn will reduce poverty, ignorance, and subsequently war. Supporting technological innovation doesn’t mean buying the latest gadget and throwing it away as soon as the next version comes out. It means understanding that technology has given us a great many good things: clean water, electricity, information, medicine, transportation, insights into the human condition, etc., etc. And technology will continue to improve the lives of many by many orders of magnitude over the next several decades. We can help both the Earth heal and a great many suffering people live better lives with technology without subscribing to a semi-spiritualist, quasi-messianic view of some post-human Singular age.