Speculative Fiction Author
“In Memory of a Summer’s Day”
Mad Hatters and March Hares
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“Love Engine Optimization”
Lightspeed Magazine
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“The Last Novelist (or A Dead Lizard in the Yard)”
Tor.com
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“The Great Game at the End of the World”
Hex Publications
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“The Singularity is in Your Hair”
Cyber World
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“The Meeker and the All-Seeing Eye”
Nebula Awards Showcase 2016
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“The Garden Beyond Her Infinite Skies”
XB-1
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“One Spring in Cherryville”
Available in most ebook formats
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“The Sounds of Old Earth”
Nebula Awards Showcase 2015
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“Demon in Aisle 6”
Nightmare Magazine
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“The Meeker and the All-Seeing Eye”
Almanah Anticipatia 2016
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“The Problem of Meat”
Grendelsong
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“The Sounds of Old Earth”
科幻世界 (Science Fiction World)
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“The Garden Beyond Her Infinite Skies”
Clarkesworld Magazine
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“The Meeker and the All-Seeing Eye”
World Chinese SF Association
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“Cameron Rhyder’s Legs”
Clarkesworld Magazine #98
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“The History Within Us”
XB-1 Issue 11/2014
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“The Sounds of Old Earth”
Космопорт (Kosmoport)
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“The Sounds of Old Earth”
XB-1 Issue 8/2014
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“The Meeker and the All-Seeing Eye”
Clarkesworld Magazine #92
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“Pheth’s Aviary”
Beneath Ceaseless Skies - Issue 133
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“The Last Probe”
Launch Pad
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“The History Within Us”
Clarkesworld Year Four
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“The Sounds of Old Earth”
Lightspeed Magazine and io9.com
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“The Great Game at the End of the World”
After
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“The Suffering Gallery”
The Best of Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Year Three
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“The Hands That Feed”
The Mammoth Book of Steampunk
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“The Bricks of Gelecek”
Naked City
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“The Hands That Feed”
Steam-Powered: Lesbian Steampunk Stories
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“The History Within Us”
The People of the Book
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“The Suffering Gallery”
Beneath Ceaseless Skies - Issue 57
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“The History Within Us”
Clarkesworld Magazine #42
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“The Girl in the Basement”
Apex Magazine, Vol 3, Issue 3
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“The Spaces Between Things”
Electric Velocipede 17/18
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“The Girl in the Basement”
Hatter Bones
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“Saving Diego”
Interzone #221
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“The Sembla”
A Field Guide to Surreal Botany
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“The Writing’s on the Wall”
Farrago's Wainscot #5
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“Marie and the Mathematicians”
Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine #26
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“The Thing in the Refrigerator That Could Stop Time”
Apex Science Fiction and Horror Digest
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Story sale: “The Words That Maketh Murder”

My short story, “The Words That Maketh Murder”1 will appear in a future podcast of Tales to TerrifyThe story is about haunted train yards, drones, the MTA, and black magic.

Yes, it’s named after a PJ Harvey song.


Why Blade Runner is More Relevant Than Ever

When the original Blade Runner film was released in 1982 to mediocre box-office sales and lukewarm reviews, few could predict the film would have such a lasting legacy. For nearly three decades, the film’s neon-saturated, overcrowded, rain-swept dystopia served as the default backdrop for dozens, if not hundreds of science-fiction films. Even the Star Wars prequels borrowed (or ripped-off) the film’s noirish cyberdream vision for some of its urban landscapes. But more so than its look, Blade Runner’s themes have survived long past its inception date…

Keep reading at Tor.com.


New story coming soon in Nightmare magazine

I’m happy to announce that I’ve just sold a new story. “Will You Meet Me There, Out Beyond the Bend?” will appear in a future issue of Nightmare magazine. This will be my second story in Nightmare

It’s about ghosts, car accidents, family, and human nesting behaviors.


You Can Still Be an Optimist and Warn About the Dangers of AI

I recently heard a few writers griping about how predictors of artificial intelligence have it all wrong, that those who warn of impending doom from our soon-to-be AI “overlords” are Chicken Littles. I think that’s a dangerous philosophy to have. When the world’s top computer scientists suggest that we will have artificial general intelligence on par with a human being in as little as two decades, I think it makes sense to consider the negative consequences of what that might mean *now* and not when it arrives. Because by then it will be too late.

Yes, AI promises to bring a great many positive things into the world. Automation, combined with a universal income, would free us up to do all the things we wish we could do but never get to, because we are constantly struggling to stay afloat financially. AI could bring about a new golden age. But it could bring about a dark age too, if we aren’t careful. These prognosticators who are warning against AI are like the climatologists who say that if we don’t drastically reduce our CO2 pollution, things are going to get bad for us real soon. Except AI could be far worse in terms of people affected, since our entire world is dependent on networked technology (as the recent hurricanes have made clear.)


Optimism is Hard

A friend of mine posted on social media recently about the fact that if we don’t curb our CO2 emissions, the world in 2100 will be an ugly place to live. He quoted a CNN article which said:

If we surpass that mark, it has been estimated by scientists that life on our planet will change as we know it. Rising seas, mass extinctions, super droughts, increased wildfires, intense hurricanes, decreased crops and fresh water and the melting of the Arctic are expected.

The impact on human health would be profound. Rising temperatures and shifts in weather would lead to reduced air quality, food and water contamination, more infections carried by mosquitoes and ticks and stress on mental health, according to a recent report from the Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health.

In response to this post, a commenter said: “This drives home the point that it’s about saving ourselves not the planet.”

I responded, “Well, that’s a profoundly lovely message to leave to the next generation.”

Look, optimism is hard. It’s much easier to be a cynic, because that means you bear no responsibility. “Hey, there’s nothing I can do, so why not have fun while I’m here? YOLO, and all that.” It’s much, much harder to say, “There are a lot of huge problems affecting the world now. A lot of them seem intractable. But unless we do something, nothing will change. Maybe I can’t change everything. But maybe I can do one small thing. It may amount to nothing. It might not make a difference. But it also just might. And if ten, a hundred, a thousand people do something small, then that’s not such a small thing anymore.”

Cynicism is lazy. It’s the moral equivalent of not taking out the garbage, letting the dishes fester in the sink. Optimism is work. It means we have to be vigilant of not just our thoughts, but our deeds. It means we have to use our minds to dream up new ways of doing things that might be better and be open to trying those things, even if they fail.

So here’s some advice. Don’t be a cynic. It’s ugly, like a pile of overflowing garbage in the trash can and festering dishes in the sink. Just because problems are hard shouldn’t mean we don’t do anything to address them.


Some New Reviews

I received some nice reviews of “Love Engine Optimization” recently:

SFRevu says:

“Very good and scary character study and warning. Ends with a nice chill.” 

And Strange Shuttle says:

“Despite having a wholly unlikable protagonist (then again, isn’t that the point?), this story really worked for me. Kressel clearly knows his tech, and he employs precise language in this tale of manipulated love. The hacker v. hacker subplot adds just the right amount conflict leading up to the fallout in the end. If you like near-future science fiction, “Love Engine Optimization” is a must read.” 

You can read the story here.


Locus Review of “Love Engine Optimization”

Mercurio D. Rivera informs me that my story “Love Engine Optimization” got a nice write-up in Locus from Rich Horton: “[The story has] a timely central notion: a way of using deep data (with realtime help) to attract romantic partners. The question, of course, is how “real” such a romance would be. Kressel makes the story work by focusing on the character and drives of the protagonist, with an honest and dark twist of the knife at the end.” Here’s the story if you want to check it out.